Lowcountry Karaoke Idol Contest


Today is such a beautiful day within the lowcountry of Charleston, SC. A day to appreciate life along with all the blessings that arrive with each passing day. Lately, I’ve been stuck in a tsunami of grief and depression, unable to laugh, smile, or simply be the person I was before grief overtook me when I lost my precious Prince Marmaduke Shamus. This week, my friends have worked hard to get me out of my depression. Last night, we decided to go to Manhattan’s Bar & Grill in Mt. Pleasant to do karaoke. Karaoke is a regular Friday night date for all of us, but last night everyone encouraged me to enter the Lowcountry Karaoke Idol Contest. One of my best friends, Betty, encouraged me to enter on Wednesday night, suggesting that I should sing, “At Last.”

So, when we arrived at Manhattan’s, Betty, Mac and I decided to enter — just to see what would happen. None of us anticipated doing well, but we knew we would compete by giving our all. We introduced ourselves to the deejay, Will, inquiring about the rules. Sounds simple enough. You must sing a tune you are familiar with. If your eyes glance at the monitor, points will be taken away. No problem. Betty was still a bit apprehensive, but I was raring to go. Ok…I admit it…I love being on stage!

At 10:30, the competition began. Six contestants had signed up for the competition. Betty’s name was drawn as contestant #1. She belted out “Blue”, hitting those high notes like she always does, doing a great job. Mac, was the great performer, singing his song (sorry, I always forget the name of it) getting the crowd involved while he sang a sad country song about lost love. He does these songs so well, especially the George Jones tunes. Contestant number five was called up — “Barbie.” Finally, I thought, by now I wanted to just get up there and sing and get it over with.

I grabbed the wireless microphone and walked away from the monitor. I did not want to lose any points by looking at it, besides — I know the lyrics of “At Last,” without even thinking about the song.

To make a long story short — when the judges results were revealed, there was a tie. I heard my name. Shocked! This can’t be! Never have I been a finalist in ANY talent show.

Sorry, I can’t recall the guy’s name who was involved with a tie with me, but we had to turn in another song to compete against each other. My husband and friends suggested I sing, “Sweet Nothings,” an old tune recorded originally by Brenda Lee. When my name was called, I reached for the wireless mic — “Uh huh. Honey…All right…”

Working the audience, I sang to complete strangers, getting them involved…rocking and rolling…and dancing…never thinking about the lyrics while recognizing I probably didn’t stand one chance to be selected as the finalist. After all, the crowd at Manhattan’s consist of the younger in crowd. The judges were much younger than I, and I imagined they would select someone who attends the bar as a “regular,” not some wild and crazy woman who hasn’t been to Manhattan’s since before Shamus died.

After the judges turned in the results, my name was called. I couldn’t believe it. Me!???! All of my friends squealed with delight.

For me, I don’t think the reality has kicked in yet. Trapped inside my youth, when I found the nerve to enter a talent show, never did I win, or become a finalist. I simply walked off the stage while thinking to myself, Oh well…Mama said I would never win.
What comes next? Who knows. I will sift through all of my songs while asking friends at the Elks Lodge and my closest friends what songs I should have ready for the finals. According to Will, the deejay, I will be contacted either by phone or e-mail about the finals.  For me, it is still surreal. Perhaps some might think “You had to know you’d be a finalist,” but I did not. I simply entered just to see what would happen.
My childhood dream was to become a singer. Married at 17, I confess, I never found the courage to even try, until now — at a time of life that some refer to as the ‘golden or retirement years.’ I certainly do not describe myself as ‘golden’ or ‘retirement’ — more like a wild and crazy rock star woman who refuses to get old, or to act it. Age is only a state of mind, and I intend to rock my way now, as a singer.
Suppose I’ll have more to write about later, and I do not anticipate winning. Charleston has lots of talented singers!
 
 

?This is Only a Test?


No, I haven’t lost my mind…YET! I am simply freewriting a test to see IF this silly blog will post a link on Facebook. Seems I am having issues again — lately!

Yes, I’m blonde, but I am fairly intelligent about computers, at least, I thought I was…and I confess, my husband is BRILLIANT with computers.

So——-, this is a test. Nothing more. Let me save it, publish it and see if this baby works today.

This is a test! Gosh, how I detest tests!

For the Dads on Father’s Day


Dearest Readers:

This Sunday, June 15, 2014 is Father’s Day. I am sharing a post below about Father’s Day. I hope you will enjoy and take the time to appreciate your father or husband or loved one.

Today is a beautiful day in Charleston, SC. Blue skies, a slight breeze, and gorgeous bright sunshine. Today is truly a day of appreciation — for life, love, family and all that we in America are blessed with, especially on Father’s Day.

To all the fathers, and the fathers-to-be, I would like to extend a blessed and loving Happy Father’s Day. My wish for you is that all of your children and wives will appreciate all that you are and will spoil you just a bit today. Let us all make the time to say, “Happy Father’s Day,” and to make the time to do something special for Dad. Even if it is only a short phone call to say, “Happy Father’s Day,” please make the time to express your love and appreciation.

Father’s come in all shapes and sizes, all temperaments and there are times when father’s may not have the patience they need. Becoming a parent doesn’t come with a guide book of instructions, nor do we take classes for parenting. We simply become a parent, hoping we will make the right decisions.

I lost my father on Tuesday, July 6, 1999. For two years I watched him fighting the debilitating disease of esophageal cancer. I watched his body slowly melting away from him. At first, he was robbed of health, then his strength and independence. Gone was the ability to eat food. His body was attached to a feeding tube, he commonly referred to it as his umbilical cord. He detested it! After his body refused to allow his independence to return, we admitted him to a convalescent center. He coped with his new residency, but was never happy there. Daily, I visited him. At first, he welcomed me with open arms. A few months before he died, he became angry, shouting at me…telling me to leave, and not to come back. His roommate said he was mean to me. “No,”I defended. “He isn’t mean. He just wants me to leave.”

On July 4, 1999, I saw my dad for the last time. Walking into his room, he was sitting in a chair, reading his Bible. His head lifted to look at me, but he did not welcome me. He continued to recite Bible verses, telling me to ‘go on… get out of here. I don’t want you here.’

Exhausted, I left in tears. On July 5, I returned to work. Working a bit late, I drove home, completely exhausted. Early in the morning of July 6, I awoke from a frightening nightmare. I suppose you could say, I have the gift (or wickedness) of visions. In this dream my dad was dying. I looked at the clock. It was 3:45 am. I reached for the phone. Dialed a portion of the phone number to the nursing home, stopped dialing, and hung up the phone. I did not go back to sleep.

That day at work, I phoned the nursing home several times. I was told my dad was doing well, or ‘as well as to be expected.’ Before arriving for my visit, my dad took a fall. He was eating dinner when I arrived. Placing my hand on the door of his room, I met up with a nurse, with an oxygen tank by her side. She motioned for me to move away and not to come inside. I knew what was going on. I screamed.I looked at my watch. It was 5:45pm. Again, a vision I had was coming true!

Standing next to my dad’s doorway, I listened to the actions of the nurses. They encouraged me to tell them to bring him back. I declined. “No,” I cried. “Just let him go with dignity.”

The death certificate recorded his death at 6pm. In all reality, he died at 5:45, when I was about to enter his room. This year will be the 15th anniversary of his death. I no longer have a Father to wish “Happy Father’s Day.” Today, I will think of him, as I do every day. I will pray that he will enjoy today with his identical twin brother, his parents and other siblings and relatives. Yes, I miss him, but I know that he is in a better place…no longer attached to an umbilical cord, and now he can take his daily strolls and he can sing again.

Happy Father’s Day to all of the special men I have been blessed to know in my lifetime. Many of you know who you are! As for me and my husband, I intend to take him to dinner and to spend the day with him. How I wish I could spend the day with my dad, and I wish I could spoil him a bit on Father’s Day. Let us all appreciate the fathers of the world. Let us share kindness and love to them. After all, we never know what tomorrow may bring. Happy Father’s Day with my thoughts, love and kindness! I am blessed to know many of you!

For All the Dads on Father’s Day


Today is a beautiful day in Charleston, SC. Blue skies, a slight breeze, and gorgeous bright sunshine. Today is truly a day of appreciation — for life, love, family and all that we in America are blessed with, especially on Father’s Day.

To all the fathers, and the fathers-to-be, I would like to extend a blessed and loving Happy Father’s Day. My wish for you is that all of your children and wives will appreciate all that you are and will spoil you just a bit today. Let us all make the time to say, “Happy Father’s Day,” and to make the time to do something special for Dad. Even if it is only a short phone call to say, “Happy Father’s Day,” please make the time to express your love and appreciation.

Father’s come in all shapes and sizes, all temperaments and there are times when father’s may not have the patience they need. Becoming a parent doesn’t come with a guide book of instructions, nor do we take classes for parenting. We simply become a parent, hoping we will make the right decisions.

I lost my father on Tuesday, July 6, 1999. For two years I watched him fighting the debilitating disease of esophageal cancer. I watched his body slowly melting away from him. At first, he was robbed of health, then his strength and independence. Gone was the ability to eat food. His body was attached to a feeding tube, he commonly referred to it as his umbilical cord. He detested it! After his body refused to allow his independence to return, we admitted him to a convalescent center. He coped with his new residency, but was never happy there. Daily, I visited him. At first, he welcomed me with open arms. A few months before he died, he became angry, shouting at me…telling me to leave, and not to come back. His roommate said he was mean to me. No, I said. He isn’t mean. He just wants me to leave.

On July 4, 1999, I saw my dad for the last time. Walking into his room, he was sitting in a chair, reading his Bible. His head lifted to look at me, but he did not welcome me. He continued to recite Bible verses, telling me to ‘go on… get out of here. I don’t want you here.’

Exhausted, I left in tears. On July 5, I returned to work. Working a bit late, I drove home, completely exhausted. Early in the morning of July 6, I awoke from a frightening nightmare. I had dreamed my dad was dying. I looked at the clock. It was 3:45 am. I reached for the phone. Dialed a portion of the phone number to the nursing home, stopped dialing, and hung up the phone. I did not go back to sleep. That day at work, I phoned the nursing home several times. I was told my dad was doing well, or ‘as well as to be expected.’ Before arriving for my visit, my dad took a fall. He was eating dinner when I arrived. Placing my hand on the door of his room, I met up with a nurse, with an oxygen tank by her side. She motioned for me to move away and not to come inside. I knew what was going on. I screamed.

I looked at my watch. It was 5:45pm. Standing next to my dad’s doorway, I listened to the actions of the nurses. They encouraged me to tell them to bring him back. I declined. “No,” I cried. “Just let him go with dignity.”

The death certificate recorded his death at 6pm. In all reality, he died at 5:45, when I was about to enter his room.

This year will be the 13th anniversary of his death. I no longer have a Father to wish “Happy Father’s Day.” Today, I will think of him, as I do every day. I will pray that he will enjoy today with his identical twin brother, his parents and other siblings and relatives. Yes, I miss him, but I know that he is in a better place…no longer attached to an umbilical cord, and now he can take his daily strolls and he can sing again.

Happy Father’s Day to all of you Dads. As for me and my husband, I intend to take him to dinner and to spend the day with him. How I wish I could spend the day with my dad, and I wish I could spoil him a bit on Father’s Day. Let us all appreciate the fathers of the world. Let us share kindness and love to them. After all, we never know what tomorrow may bring. Happy Father’s Day!

Fostering a Rescue Schnauzer


If you read my blog occasionally, you will know what an advocate I am for animals, especially schnauzers. On May 2, 2012, I lost a part of my heart when my precious rescue giant schnauzer, Prince Marmaduke Shamus crossed over to Rainbow Bridge. After his loss, I have been devastated. Unable to laugh. Unable to smile. Unable to enjoy life. Awakening in the mornings, I cried. And cried. And cried. I described my emotional pain like a giant tsunami, rushing over me with torrential waves, sucking me into the deepness of the waves until I struggled and gasped just to breathe.

I volunteer to foster mini-schnauzers. Checking my e-mail one morning, I read an urgent plea from Schnauzer Rescue of the Carolinas. http://www.schnauzerrescueofthecarolinas.org/Adoptable%20Dogs.htm

Due to a hoarding incident, they needed volunteers to take in a few dogs. Immediately, I contacted them, drove to pick up a new foster, and shared my love and agony with him. He was adopted within two weeks. Still grieving over the loss of “Shamus” I cried when his new mommy came to take him home. Within a few days, I had a new foster. His name is Hank. He is tiny, grumpy and a barrel of fun.

Allow me to introduce you to Hank.

Hank  weighs about 17 pounds. His coat is black and silver and he has an adorable little face. Truly, he is looking for a home that will love him and give him lots of attention. At our home, Hank is doing well, enjoying being a part of our family. He plays well with the other dogs. He appears to want to be the ‘alpha’ dog, but will respond well to commands. He knows ‘stay’, ‘let’s go potty’ and ‘sit’. His appetite is great and he finished the medication for his cough; although I never heard him coughing. In the mornings, he was a bit congested, but that has cleared up significantly.

 While working out on the treadmill one day, I looked down to see Hank walking on it with me. I moved over to the right, so he could have a bit of room — in all reality, he was attempting to take the entire treadmill!  He enjoys the treadmill and takes it seriously, walking with a slow pace until he gets tired and jumps off. He is such a little jewel! When he is outside with the other dogs, he runs around the yard, running in circles, getting much exercise and fun. When I sit outside to watch the pups play, he runs over to me, ready to share a bit of affection.

 The adoptive family of Hank will be so blessed to have him. Yes, he growls and barks, and he does not like being startled. I suspect he experienced a bit of life without love, acceptance and affection and now that he has these three components for a happy life, he is protective of it. Adoptive parents must remember, sometimes a rescue animal is fearful until he or she recognizes that his new family accept him and will love him, just like the rescue dog will love his family – unconditionally. Hank is a lot of fun. We are doing our best to teach him ‘no’, telling him not to bark, but Hank is a character who wants his voice to be heard. His bark and skittish nature is simply a portion of who Hank is. Hank is truly a little love bug that needs a good home. If a treadmill is included, Hank will work out with you!

For additional information about Hank, visit http://www.schnauzerrescueofthecarolinas.org/Adoptable%20Dogs.htm click on to the link “Hank”.

You may leave a message with me and I will guide you through the adoptive process.  Hank is adorable!


Today was D-day for me…the day to go to the meeting, face the consequences and see how much I have lost/or gained this week. I just don’t understand. I’ve stuck to the program. I’ve worked out almost every day — earning 31 points for Live Life Active. Today, when I got on the scales — up two pounds.
What am I doing wrong? Yes, I am under a lot of stress. I lost my precious giant schnauzer five weeks ago and his loss has left a gigantic hole in my heart. I cry all the time. I can’t seem to relax. I just want to run away from life, but I can’t. Life must go on. I have lots to do, people who love me, and I am not done with my life. Stress is driving me nuts! This week, I will do my best to feed myself positive thoughts. Next week is going to be a loss.  Do you hear me Weight Watchers? Next week will be my week. I will lose!!!

Losing Weight


Today was D-day for me…the day to go to the Weight Watchers meeting, face the consequences and see how much I have lost/or gained this week. I just don’t understand. I’ve stuck to the program. I’ve worked out almost every day — earning 31 points for Live Life Active. Today, when I got on the scales — up two pounds.
What am I doing wrong? Yes, I am under a lot of stress. I lost my precious giant schnauzer five weeks ago and his loss has left a gigantic hole in my heart. I cry all the time. I can’t seem to relax. I just want to run away from life, but I can’t. Life must go on. I have lots to do, people who love me, and I am not done with my life. Stress is driving me nuts! This week, I will do my best to feed myself positive thoughts. Next week is going to be a loss.  Do you hear me Weight Watchers? Next week WILL BE A LOSS!

Just a Test — Freewriting


Hello, World:

This is only a test to see if my scribblings will post on Facebook again. Yes, I know, I’ve been negligent — not writing any posts lately since losing my precious Prince Marmaduke Shamus, my gentle giant schnauzer I still ache for.

Perhaps tomorrow I will write again — something I haven’t done in over five weeks. Life does have to go on, although my heart breaks each time I think about my special boy, Shamey-Pooh.

Suppose you’ll just have to ‘wait and see’ if I find the muse tomorrow. I certainly hope I do.